Posts in Category: Architecture

The Golden Rule Co.

So Inclined

Houses in Safranbolu

Safranbolu is a city in the northern part of Turkey’s Anatolian region, getting up close to the mountain ranges near the Black Sea. Safranbolu is named after the saffron flowers that grow there, but today it is mostly known for its early 19th-century Ottoman houses that led to the town’s designation as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Al-Aqsa Mosque Door

Abandoned Greek Orthodox Church

The village of Livissi entered the 20th century with a population of 2000, almost all of them Greek Orthodox Christians. However, the events leading to the wholesale population exchange of ethnic Greeks and Turks between the two countries’ mainlands completely emptied the village by 1922. Now known as Kayaköy (“Rock Village” in Turkish), it is a vacant ghost town attracting occasional tourists near Turkey’s Mediterranean coast.

This picture was taken inside the sanctuary of the “Lower Church,” one of two cathedrals built in the village in the late 1800s.

Mosque Windows And Doors

Open Palace In Gülşehir

The deserted, rock-cut village now called Açıksaray (Open Palace) is a fascinating place to explore, in my opinion one of the more interesting and relaxing in Cappadocia, and made more so by the small number of visitors. When we were there in October, we found probably about eight people besides ourselves in the entire site. The village, just outside the Turkish town of Gülşehir, dates to the 10th or 11th century and covers about a square kilometer, containing chapels, kitchens, mushroom-shaped rock formations, and dwellings, probably for monks. This is the facade of the largest complex.

Jerusalem: An Ecumenical View

This picture was taken from within the Dominus Flevit chapel on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, commemorating the site where Jesus is said to have wept over Jerusalem, and gives a pretty good ecumenical overview of the city that is central to the three great monotheistic world religions. The cross silhouette visible in the window latticework in the foreground gives way to Jewish graveyards at the base of the east wall of the temple mount, where Jewish belief expects the Messiah to one day enter the city. Behind these rise the shining domes of the temple mount’s current occupant: the architectural marvel of Islam’s Dome of the Rock.

Blue Car With Green Hill: Safranbolu

I like this one a lot for some reason. I think the color of the car works well with the green in the grass, and meanwhile the hill and the houses make for a nice composition together. This is Safranbolu again, still in the old town, with these houses providing an example of what the 18th and 19th century Ottoman architecture looks like when it hasn’t been restored.

Wooden Door With Sloping Roof: Safranbolu

Thought it was about time for another door. This one appeared almost directly across the street as I set out for a morning walk on a cold foggy day in Safranbolu. The town, in northern Turkey, is perhaps the most comprehensive preserved example of traditional Ottoman architecture, with nearly all structures in the old part of town dating back 100-600 years, and many of the houses well restored.