Posts Tagged: color

Small Town American Red

Kid in a Turkish Carpet Store

Carpets, Art and Cobblestones

Mosque Windows And Doors

Carpet Repairman In Göreme Poses As Sun God

Just kidding! I’m sure he is a devout Muslim and would never think of such a thing. The circular design behind him just looks a lot like a rising sun to me. I imagine a person could get desensitized to the brilliant patterns after hanging around these things all day long for years on end … you know, like teenagers playing violent video games. Of course, in other ways, repairing Turkish carpets is nothing at all like playing violent video games. I admit the analogy is limited.

Whatever else the carpet repairman’s job may or may not be, there is one thing it is for sure (at least, wherever I’ve seen it being done): a man’s work. In the same way that I’ve never seen a Turkish man sitting at a loom weaving a carpet, I’ve never seen a Turkish woman sitting in front of a shop repairing one. While I’m sure there are exceptions, the roles in my experience seem clearly defined. My best guess at the explanation is that in traditional Turkish village society (which bore the weaving tradition to the present day), women more generally are responsible for work done in or around the home, whereas men are more often responsible for work done someplace else, such as at a shop or office. As Turkish society becomes more modernized, of course, in many places these sorts of divisions (and skills?) are beginning to disappear.

Sunset Over Antioch

Children’s Greetings

Turkish and American children in Ankara.

“One city does not greet another, but one man greets another.”

– Sumerian proverb from Ur,  c. 2000 B.C.

This proverb, quoted in Rory Stewart’s excellent book The Prince Of The Marshes, does a pretty good job of explaining how I think relationships are most genuinely formed on the international stage. In our case, we usually leave the greeting to our children. These pictures should give you an idea of the scene a year or so ago when we went on a walk with our kids through the historic Ulus neighborhood in downtown Ankara. Kaya is the little blonde two-year-old in the picture above; at that age he was still loving the attention and hadn’t gotten sick of it yet, whereas his older brother Moses (in the stroller below) was starting to develop some reservations. Perhaps it’s just a personality thing – international diplomacy can’t be every preschooler’s job.

Turkish and American children in Ankara.

Copper And Bronze In Cappadocia

Copper and bronze crosses, church keys, irons, and door knockers – some old, some pretending to be old – on display in front of an antique shop in Goreme. Since Turkey is officially a 99.7% Muslim country by population, the presence of so many crosses may seem surprising. These and the keys were likely collected from the many vacant Armenian churches to be found around central Anatolia and farther to the southeast. The large door knockers may have been used on the large houses of the wealthy throughout the area during Ottoman times.

Jerusalem Souvenirs: Multilingual

Wedding in Elbistan

Murat and Servet’s wedding in the southeastern province of Kahramanmaraş was a typically chaotic celebration with plenty of dancing, attended by just about as many people as could comfortably fit on the (very large) dance floor. The entire town is often invited to a wedding in Turkey, and the more people come the greater the honor for the father of the groom.