Posts Tagged: cultural

Abandoned Greek Orthodox Church

The village of Livissi entered the 20th century with a population of 2000, almost all of them Greek Orthodox Christians. However, the events leading to the wholesale population exchange of ethnic Greeks and Turks between the two countries’ mainlands completely emptied the village by 1922. Now known as Kayaköy (“Rock Village” in Turkish), it is a vacant ghost town attracting occasional tourists near Turkey’s Mediterranean coast.

This picture was taken inside the sanctuary of the “Lower Church,” one of two cathedrals built in the village in the late 1800s.

Jewish Band: Figurines In A Jerusalem Window

Jewish Ossuaries In Jerusalem

A visitor looks through a sunlit window into a cave full of centuries-old Jewish ossuaries, or bone boxes, on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. Ossuaries have been used for the internment of skeletal remains by many different cultures throughout history, but they were especially popular among Jews of the Second Temple Period (40 B.C. – 135 A.D.). These date to that time.

Hats And Shoes In Ankara

Hats for sale in Ankara

 

Ottoman Shoes And Lamp

Window shopping in Ulus. The hatter is probably frequented by older Turks for whom the hat is part of the standard winter uniform while taking their daily constitutional from home to the tea house; The shoes and lamps are nostalgic reminders of medieval times, bought by tourists and more modern Turks to decorate their homes.

Jerusalem Scenes

Here’s a selection of shots from a recent trip to Jerusalem, featuring Christian, Muslim and Jewish sites, mostly focused around or viewed from the Mount of Olives. In future posts I’ll try to put up some shots from the Wailing Wall (or Western Wall) of the Temple Mount, as well as some of my best attempts at street photography from one afternoon in the city. Enjoy!

Children’s Greetings

Turkish and American children in Ankara.

“One city does not greet another, but one man greets another.”

– Sumerian proverb from Ur,  c. 2000 B.C.

This proverb, quoted in Rory Stewart’s excellent book The Prince Of The Marshes, does a pretty good job of explaining how I think relationships are most genuinely formed on the international stage. In our case, we usually leave the greeting to our children. These pictures should give you an idea of the scene a year or so ago when we went on a walk with our kids through the historic Ulus neighborhood in downtown Ankara. Kaya is the little blonde two-year-old in the picture above; at that age he was still loving the attention and hadn’t gotten sick of it yet, whereas his older brother Moses (in the stroller below) was starting to develop some reservations. Perhaps it’s just a personality thing – international diplomacy can’t be every preschooler’s job.

Turkish and American children in Ankara.

Copper And Bronze In Cappadocia

Copper and bronze crosses, church keys, irons, and door knockers – some old, some pretending to be old – on display in front of an antique shop in Goreme. Since Turkey is officially a 99.7% Muslim country by population, the presence of so many crosses may seem surprising. These and the keys were likely collected from the many vacant Armenian churches to be found around central Anatolia and farther to the southeast. The large door knockers may have been used on the large houses of the wealthy throughout the area during Ottoman times.

Jerusalem Souvenirs: Multilingual

Wedding in Elbistan

Murat and Servet’s wedding in the southeastern province of Kahramanmaraş was a typically chaotic celebration with plenty of dancing, attended by just about as many people as could comfortably fit on the (very large) dance floor. The entire town is often invited to a wedding in Turkey, and the more people come the greater the honor for the father of the groom.

Disappearing Into The Turkish Autumn Woods