Posts Tagged: traditional

Beehive Houses in Harran

Carpets, Art and Cobblestones

Door on Christian Quarter Street

Selling Carpets On An Ankara Street

This picture was taken in the Ulus neighborhood, just down the hill from Ankara’s historic castle, which was really the only part of the city to speak of before Ataturk made it the capital of the new Turkish Republic. The castle area has been protected from development for tourism-related reasons and can sometimes seem like a village in the center of the city, which is of course now a modern metropolis with four and a half million people living in it. Meanwhile, the streets around the castle have experienced an increasing proliferation of carpet and antique dealers, including this gentleman offering kilims, cicims, and suzani along with knotted-pile hali carpets, just down the street from a row of copper workers.

Jerusalem Souvenirs: Multilingual

Wedding in Elbistan

Murat and Servet’s wedding in the southeastern province of Kahramanmaraş was a typically chaotic celebration with plenty of dancing, attended by just about as many people as could comfortably fit on the (very large) dance floor. The entire town is often invited to a wedding in Turkey, and the more people come the greater the honor for the father of the groom.

Hats For Sale

This hatter in Ankara, like basically every other shopkeeper in Turkey, is a proud Kemal Ataturk fan. I guess that’s not enough to keep him from displaying an Ottoman-style fez, outlawed at one point by the great reformer of modern Turkey. At least it’s red so it matches the Turkish flag inside the shop, and as a photographer I appreciate that.

Near East Collage, Handmade

In front of a shop on the street in Ankara. From top to bottom: a hand-woven kilim, probably Armenian or Moldavian; a hand-embroidered souzani, possibly from Uzbekistan; and an old hand-carved wooden trousseau chest made in Turkey, whether Ankara, Istanbul or one of the towns closer to the Black Sea.

Shalwar At The Tea House

Ottoman Shoes For Sale

The shadow of the Ottomans is still visible in many clothing styles worn throughout Turkey today. Although I haven’t seen Ottoman-style leather slippers like this worn by anybody I know in Ankara, presumably somebody wears them if they are on sale at the shop in the Ulus neighborhood where I took this picture. Then again, they could be just for tourists. That doesn’t mean that old-fashioned Ottoman dress isn’t still alive and well in many parts of the country. Shalwar pants like those worn as far east as Afghanistan are still in fashion for men and women in southeast Anatolia, starting in Tarsus.